SpringSource buying Gemstone: VMware’s written all over it

There they go again. Barely a month after announcing the acquisition of message broker Rabbit Technologies, SpringSource is adding yet one more piece to its middleware stack: it has announced the acquisition of Gemstone for its distributed data caching technology.

SpringSource’s Rod Johnson told us that he was planning to acquire such a technology even before VMware came into the picture, but make no mistake about it, VMware’s presence upped the ante.

SpringSource has been looking to fill out its stack vs. Oracle and IBM ever since its cornerstone acquisition of Covalent (which brought the expertise behind Apache Tomcat and bequeathed the world tc Server) two years ago. Adding Gemstone’s Gemfire becomes SpringSource’s response to Oracle Coherence and IBM WebSphere XD. The technologies in question allow you to replicate data from varied sources into a single logical cache, which is critical if those sources are highly dispersed.

So what about VMware? Wasn’t SpringSource planning to grow its stack anyway? There are deeper stakes at play: VMware’s aspiration to make cloud and virtualization virtually synonymous – or at least to make virtualization essential to the cloud – falls apart if you don’t have a scalable, high performance way to manage and access data. Enterprises using the cloud are not likely to move all their data there, and need a solution that allows hybrid strategies that will invariably involve a mix of cloud- and on premised-based data resources to be managed and accessed efficiently. Distributed data caching is essential.

So the next question is why SpringSource, as a historically open source company that has always made open source acquisitions, buy open source Terracotta instead? Chances are, were SpringSource still independent, it probably would have, but VMware brings deeper pockets and deeper aspirations. Gemstone is the company that sold object-oriented databases back in the 90s, and once it grew obvious that they (and other OODBMS rivals like Object Store) weren’t going to become the next Oracles, they adapted their expertise to caching. Gemfire emerged in 2002 and provided Wall Street and defense agencies an off the shelf alternative to homegrown development or a best of breed strategy. By comparison, although Terracotta boasts several Wall Street clients, its core base is in web caching for high traffic B2C oriented websites.

Bottom line: VMware needs the scale.

There are other interesting pieces that Gemstone brings to the party. It is currently developing SQLFabric, a project that embeds the Apache Derby open source relational database into Gemfire to make its distributed data grid fully SQL-compliant, which would be very strategic to VMware and SpringSource. It also has a shot-in-the-dark project, MagLev, which is more a curiosity for the mother ship. Conceivably it could provide the impetus for SpringSource to extend to the Ruby environment, but would require a lot more development work to productize.

Obviously as the deal won’t close immediately, both entities must be coy about their plans other than the obvious commitment to integrate products.

But there’s another angle that will be worth exploring once the ink dries: SpringSource has been known for simplicity. The Spring framework provided a way to abstract all the complexity out of Java EE, while tc Server, based on Tomcat, carries but a subset of the bells and whistles of full Java EE stacks. But Gemfire is hardly simple, and the market for distributed data grids has been limited to organizations with extreme processing needs who have extreme expertise and extreme budgets. Yet the move to cloud will mean, as noted above, that the need for logical data grids will trickle down to more of the enterprise mainstream, although the scope of the problem won’t be as extreme. It would make sense for the Spring framework to extend its dependency injection to a “lite” version of Gemfire (Gemcloud?) to simplify the hassle of managing data inside and outside of the cloud.

One thought on “SpringSource buying Gemstone: VMware’s written all over it”

  1. Your analysis is pretty spot on. My name is Pierce Lamb and I am an employee of GemStone. I’ve been listening to the briefings recently and heard a lot of Rod Johnson’s vision/rationale for this purchase. From what I heard, SpringSource wanted to purchase the most rock-solid Data Fabric available so they didn’t have to worry about adding a lot to the core of the product. They could rest assured that it was quality. Ease-of-use, openness, creating strong communities are part of SpringSource’s core-competencies, so they knew they could easily add these features to the product they purchased. Therefore, GemFire was a better fit than Terracotta– Terracotta, while boasting a strong community and openness, lacked the advanced customer vetting that GemFire has been through on Wall Street & The DoD, and what SpringSource wanted the most was the latter.

    I can assure you there are many exciting technology synergies to come with SpringSource & VMWare. To read more about potential synergies, check out the post our Chief Architect made today: http://bit.ly/ab78Sj

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