How should enterprises navigate forks in the Hudson?

A South Jersey neighbor of ours — runner, educator, and open source mischief maker Bob Bickelrecently blogged a status report on what’s been going on with the Jenkins open source project ever since it split off from Hudson.

That’s prompted us to wade in to ask the question that’s been glossed over by the theatrics: what about the user?

For background: This is a case of a promising grassroots technology that took off beyond expectation and became a victim of its own success: governance just did not keep up with the projects growing popularity and attractiveness to enterprise developers. The sign of a mature open source project is that its governing body has successfully balanced the conflicting pressures of constant innovation vs. the need to slow things down for stable, enterprise-ready releases. Hudson failed in this regard.

That led to unfortunate conflicts that degenerated to stupid, petty, and entirely avoidable personality squabbles that in the end screwed the very enterprise users that were pumping much of the oxygen in. We know the actors on both sides – who in their everyday roles are normal, reasonable people that got caught up in mob frenzy. Both sides shot themselves in the feet as matters careened out of control. Go to SD Times if you want the blow by blow.

So what is Hudson – or Jenkins – and why is it important?

Hudson is a continuous integration (CI) server open source project that grew very popular for Java developers. The purpose of a CI server is to support agile practices of continuous integration with a server that maintains the latest copy of the truth. The project was the brainchild of former Sun and Oracle, and current Cloudbees employee Kohsuke Kawaguchi.

Since the split, it has forked into the Hudson and Jenkins branches, with Jenkins having attracted the vast majority of committers and much livelier mailing list activity. Bickel has given us a good snapshot from the Jenkins side with which he’s aligned: a diverse governance body has been established that plans to publish results of its meetings and commit, not only to continuing the crazy schedule of weekly builds, but “stable” quarterly releases. The plan is to go “stable” with the recent 1.400 release, for which a stream of patches is underway.

So most of the committers have gone to Jenkins. Case closed? From the Hudson side, Jason van Zyl of Sonatype, whose business was built around Apache Maven, states that the essential plug-ins are already in the existing Hudson version, and that the current work is more about consolidating the technology already in place, testing it, and refactoring to comply with JSR 330, built around the dependency injection technology popularized by the Spring framework. Although the promises are to keep the APIs stable, this is going to be a rewrite of the innards of Hudson.

Behind the scenes, Sonatype is competing on the natural affinity between Maven and Hudson, which share a large mass of common users, while the emerging force behind Jenkins is Cloudbees, which wants to establish itself as the leading Java development in the cloud platform.

So if you’re wondering what to do, join the crowd. There are bigger commercial forces at work, but as far as you’re concerned, you want stable releases that don’t break the APIs you already use. Jenkins must prove it’s not just the favorite of the hard core, but that its governance structure has grown up to provide stability and assurance to the enterprise, while Hudson must prove that the new rewrite won’t destabilize the old, and that it has managed to retain the enterprise base in spite of all the noise otherwise.

Stay tuned.

April 28, 2011 update. Bob Bickel has reported to me that since the “divorce,” that Jenkins has drawn 733 commits vs 172 for Hudson.

May 4, 2011 update. Oracle has decided to submit the Hudson project to the Eclipse Foundation. Eclipse board member Mik Kersten voices his support of this effort. Oracle says it didn’t consider this before because going to Eclipse was originally perceived as being too heavyweight. This leaves us wondering, why didn’t Oracle propose to do this earlier? where was the common sense?

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